Đề Xuất 2/2023 # Reading : The Little Match Girl – Cô Bé Bán Diêm – Speak English # Top 8 Like | Chungemlachiensi.com

Đề Xuất 2/2023 # Reading : The Little Match Girl – Cô Bé Bán Diêm – Speak English # Top 8 Like

Cập nhật nội dung chi tiết về Reading : The Little Match Girl – Cô Bé Bán Diêm – Speak English mới nhất trên website Chungemlachiensi.com. Hy vọng thông tin trong bài viết sẽ đáp ứng được nhu cầu ngoài mong đợi của bạn, chúng tôi sẽ làm việc thường xuyên để cập nhật nội dung mới nhằm giúp bạn nhận được thông tin nhanh chóng và chính xác nhất.

The Little Match Girl

Most terribly cold it was; it snowed, and was nearly quite dark, and evening– the last evening of the year. In this cold and darkness there went along the street a poor little girl, bareheaded, and with naked feet. When she left home she had slippers on, it is true; but what was the good of that? They were very large slippers, which her mother had hitherto worn; so large were they; and the poor little thing lost them as she scuffled away across the street, because of two carriages that rolled by dreadfully fast.

One slipper was nowhere to be found; the other had been laid hold of by an urchin, and off he ran with it; he thought it would do capitally for a cradle when he some day or other should have children himself. So the little maiden walked on with her tiny naked feet, that were quite red and blue from cold. She carried a quantity of matches in an old apron, and she held a bundle of them in her hand. Nobody had bought anything of her the whole livelong day; no one had given her a single farthing.

She crept along trembling with cold and hunger–a very picture of sorrow, the poor little thing!

The flakes of snow covered her long fair hair, which fell in beautiful curls around her neck; but of that, of course, she never once now thought. From all the windows the candles were gleaming, and it smelt so deliciously of roast goose, for you know it was New Year’s Eve; yes, of that she thought.

Her little hands were almost numbed with cold. Oh! a match might afford her a world of comfort, if she only dared take a single one out of the bundle, draw it against the wall, and warm her fingers by it. She drew one out. “Rischt!” how it blazed, how it burnt! It was a warm, bright flame, like a candle, as she held her hands over it: it was a wonderful light. It seemed really to the little maiden as though she were sitting before a large iron stove, with burnished brass feet and a brass ornament at top. The fire burned with such blessed influence; it warmed so delightfully. The little girl had already stretched out her feet to warm them too; but–the small flame went out, the stove vanished: she had only the remains of the burnt-out match in her hand.

She rubbed another against the wall: it burned brightly, and where the light fell on the wall, there the wall became transparent like a veil, so that she could see into the room. On the table was spread a snow-white tablecloth; upon it was a splendid porcelain service, and the roast goose was steaming famously with its stuffing of apple and dried plums. And what was still more capital to behold was, the goose hopped down from the dish, reeled about on the floor with knife and fork in its breast, till it came up to the poor little girl; when–the match went out and nothing but the thick, cold, damp wall was left behind. She lighted another match. Now there she was sitting under the most magnificent Christmas tree: it was still larger, and more decorated than the one which she had seen through the glass door in the rich merchant’s house.

Thousands of lights were burning on the green branches, and gaily-colored pictures, such as she had seen in the shop-windows, looked down upon her. The little maiden stretched out her hands towards them when–the match went out. The lights of the Christmas tree rose higher and higher, she saw them now as stars in heaven; one fell down and formed a long trail of fire.

“Someone is just dead!” said the little girl; for her old grandmother, the only person who had loved her, and who was now no more, had told her, that when a star falls, a soul ascends to God.

She drew another match against the wall: it was again light, and in the lustre there stood the old grandmother, so bright and radiant, so mild, and with such an expression of love.

“Grandmother!” cried the little one. “Oh, take me with you! You go away when the match burns out; you vanish like the warm stove, like the delicious roast goose, and like the magnificent Christmas tree!” And she rubbed the whole bundle of matches quickly against the wall, for she wanted to be quite sure of keeping her grandmother near her. And the matches gave such a brilliant light that it was brighter than at noon-day: never formerly had the grandmother been so beautiful and so tall. She took the little maiden, on her arm, and both flew in brightness and in joy so high, so very high, and then above was neither cold, nor hunger, nor anxiety–they were with God.

But in the corner, at the cold hour of dawn, sat the poor girl, with rosy cheeks and with a smiling mouth, leaning against the wall–frozen to death on the last evening of the old year. Stiff and stark sat the child there with her matches, of which one bundle had been burnt. “She wanted to warm herself,” people said. No one had the slightest suspicion of what beautiful things she had seen; no one even dreamed of the splendor in which, with her grandmother she had entered on the joys of a new year.

Reading : The Little Red Riding Hood – Cô Bé Quàng Khăn Đỏ – Speak English

The Little red riding hood

Once upon a time, there was a little girl who lived in a village near the forest.  Whenever she went out, the little girl wore a red riding cloak, so everyone in the village called her Little Red Riding Hood.

One morning, Little Red Riding Hood asked her mother if she could go to visit her grandmother as it had been awhile since they’d seen each other.

“That’s a good idea,” her mother said.  So they packed a nice basket for Little Red Riding Hood to take to her grandmother.

When the basket was ready, the little girl put on her red cloak and kissed her mother goodbye.

“Remember, go straight to Grandma’s house,” her mother cautioned.  “Don’t dawdle along the way and please don’t talk to strangers!  The woods are dangerous.”

“Don’t worry, mommy,” said Little Red Riding Hood, “I’ll be careful.”

But when Little Red Riding Hood noticed some lovely flowers in the woods, she forgot her promise to her mother.  She picked a few, watched the butterflies flit about for awhile, listened to the frogs croaking and then picked a few more.

Little Red Riding Hood was enjoying the warm summer day so much, that she didn’t notice a dark shadow approaching out of the forest behind her…

Suddenly, the wolf appeared beside her.

“What are you doing out here, little girl?” the wolf asked in a voice as friendly as he could muster.

“I’m on my way to see my Grandma who lives through the forest, near the brook,”  Little Red Riding Hood replied.

Then she realized how late she was and quickly excused herself, rushing down the path to her Grandma’s house.

The wolf, in the meantime, took a shortcut…

The wolf, a little out of breath from running, arrived at Grandma’s and knocked lightly at the door.

“Oh thank goodness dear!  Come in, come in!  I was worried sick that something had happened to you in the forest,” said Grandma thinking that the knock was her granddaughter.

The wolf let himself in.  Poor Granny did not have time to say another word, before the wolf gobbled her up!

The wolf let out a satisfied burp, and then poked through Granny’s wardrobe to find a nightgown that he liked.  He added a frilly sleeping cap, and for good measure, dabbed some of Granny’s perfume behind his pointy ears.

A few minutes later, Red Riding Hood knocked on the door.  The wolf jumped into bed and pulled the covers over his nose.  “Who is it?” he called in a cackly voice.

“It’s me, Little Red Riding Hood.”

“Oh how lovely!  Do come in, my dear,” croaked the wolf.

When Little Red Riding Hood entered the little cottage, she could scarcely recognize her Grandmother.

“Grandmother!  Your voice sounds so odd.  Is something the matter?” she asked.

“Oh, I just have touch of a cold,” squeaked the wolf adding a cough at the end to prove the point.

“But Grandmother!  What big ears you have,” said Little Red Riding Hood as she edged closer to the bed.

“The better to hear you with, my dear,” replied the wolf.

“But Grandmother!  What big eyes you have,” said Little Red Riding Hood.

“The better to see you with, my dear,” replied the wolf.

“But Grandmother!  What big teeth you have,” said Little Red Riding Hood her voice quivering slightly.

“The better to eat you with, my dear,” roared the wolf and he leapt out of the bed and began to chase the little girl.

Almost too late, Little Red Riding Hood realized that the person in the bed was not her Grandmother, but a hungry wolf.

She ran across the room and through the door, shouting, “Help!  Wolf!” as loudly as she could.

A woodsman who was chopping logs nearby heard her cry and ran towards the cottage as fast as he could.

He grabbed the wolf and made him spit out the poor Grandmother who was a bit frazzled by the whole experience, but still in one piece.“Oh Grandma, I was so scared!”  sobbed Little Red Riding Hood, “I’ll never speak to strangers or dawdle in the forest again.”

“There, there, child.  You’ve learned an important lesson.  Thank goodness you shouted loud enough for this kind woodsman to hear you!”

The woodsman knocked out the wolf and carried him deep into the forest where he wouldn’t bother people any longer.

Little Red Riding Hood and her Grandmother had a nice lunch and a long chat.

Truyện Ngắn “Cô Bé Bán Diêm” Bằng Tiếng Anh

Bạn đã bao giờ xúc động với một nhân vật trong truyện cổ tích? Tôi tin chắc chắn rằng rất nhiều người đã không cầm được nước mắt khi đọc “Cô bé bán diêm”. Đây là truyện cổ tích do nhà văn người Đan Mạch Hans Christian Andersen sáng tác kể về một cô bé nghèo khổ phải đi bán diêm giữa mùa đông lạnh lẽo và từ giã cõi đời trong đêm Giáng Sinh.

Truyện nổi tiếng không chỉ bởi vì tính bi kịch của nó mà còn bởi vì vẻ đẹp của trí tưởng tượng. Tưởng tượng có thể mang lại cho chúng ta sự thoải mái, niềm an ủi và giảm bớt sự đau khổ. Nhưng qua đó cũng nhắc chúng ta về trách nhiệm của mình đối với những mãnh đời bất hạnh.

The Little Match Girl

It was so terribly cold. Snow was falling, and it was almost dark. Evening came on, the last evening of the year. In the cold and gloom a poor little girl, bareheaded and barefoot, was walking through the streets. Of course when she had left her house she’d had slippers on, but what good had they been? They were very big slippers, way too big for her, for they belonged to her mother. The little girl had lost them running across the road, where two carriages had rattled by terribly fast. One slipper she’d not been able to find again, and a boy had run off with the other, saying he could use it very well as a cradle some day when he had children of his own. And so the little girl walked on her naked feet, which were quite red and blue with the cold. In an old apron she carried several packages of matches, and she held a box of them in her hand. No one had bought any from her all day long, and no one had given her a cent.

Shivering with cold and hunger, she crept along, a picture of misery, poor little girl! The snowflakes fell on her long fair hair, which hung in pretty curls over her neck. In all the windows lights were shining, and there was a wonderful smell of roast goose, for it was New Year’s eve. Yes, she thought of that!

In a corner formed by two houses, one of which projected farther out into the street than the other, she sat down and drew up her little feet under her. She was getting colder and colder, but did not dare to go home, for she had sold no matches, nor earned a single cent, and her father would surely beat her. Besides, it was cold at home, for they had nothing over them but a roof through which the wind whistled even though the biggest cracks had been stuffed with straw and rags.

Her hands were almost dead with cold. Oh, how much one little match might warm her! If she could only take one from the box and rub it against the wall and warm her hands. She drew one out. R-r-ratch! How it sputtered and burned! It made a warm, bright flame, like a little candle, as she held her hands over it; but it gave a strange light! It really seemed to the little girl as if she were sitting before a great iron stove with shining brass knobs and a brass cover. How wonderfully the fire burned! How comfortable it was! The youngster stretched out her feet to warm them too; then the little flame went out, the stove vanished, and she had only the remains of the burnt match in her hand.

She struck another match against the wall. It burned brightly, and when the light fell upon the wall it became transparent like a thin veil, and she could see through it into a room. On the table a snow-white cloth was spread, and on it stood a shining dinner service. The roast goose steamed gloriously, stuffed with apples and prunes. And what was still better, the goose jumped down from the dish and waddled along the floor with a knife and fork in its breast, right over to the little girl. Then the match went out, and she could see only the thick, cold wall. She lighted another match. Then she was sitting under the most beautiful Christmas tree. It was much larger and much more beautiful than the one she had seen last Christmas through the glass door at the rich merchant’s home. Thousands of candles burned on the green branches, and colored pictures like those in the printshops looked down at her. The little girl reached both her hands toward them. Then the match went out. But the Christmas lights mounted higher. She saw them now as bright stars in the sky. One of them fell down, forming a long line of fire.

“Now someone is dying,” thought the little girl, for her old grandmother, the only person who had loved her, and who was now dead, had told her that when a star fell down a soul went up to God.

She rubbed another match against the wall. It became bright again, and in the glow the old grandmother stood clear and shining, kind and lovely.

“Grandmother!” cried the child. “Oh, take me with you! I know you will disappear when the match is burned out. You will vanish like the warm stove, the wonderful roast goose and the beautiful big Christmas tree!”

And she quickly struck the whole bundle of matches, for she wished to keep her grandmother with her. And the matches burned with such a glow that it became brighter than daylight. Grandmother had never been so grand and beautiful. She took the little girl in her arms, and both of them flew in brightness and joy above the earth, very, very high, and up there was neither cold, nor hunger, nor fear-they were with God.

But in the corner, leaning against the wall, sat the little girl with red cheeks and smiling mouth, frozen to death on the last evening of the old year. The New Year’s sun rose upon a little pathetic figure. The child sat there, stiff and cold, holding the matches, of which one bundle was almost burned.

“She wanted to warm herself,” the people said. No one imagined what beautiful things she had seen, and how happily she had gone with her old grandmother into the bright New Year.

Share this:

Twitter

Facebook

Like this:

Like

Loading…

Cô Bán Sầu Riêng – Tống Phước Hiệp Vĩnh Long

Kính thưa quý thầy cô

Thưa các bạn CHS của trường

Trang web này là bộ mới của trang chúng tôi do một nhóm CHS của trường thực hiện từ năm 2009. Thời gian qua, bản tin cũng đã làm được một số việc có ích như kết nối liên hệ các thế hệ cựu học sinh trong và ngoài nước với nhau, tìm được những bạn bè mà từ lâu không liên lạc được, giúp các bạn có nơi chia sẻ kinh nghiệm sống, giải trí, tìm được những kỷ niệm thân thương của một thời học dưới mái trường.

Đến nay, nhu cầu thông tin đa dạng, đối tượng bạn đọc cần rộng mở, buộc lòng chúng tôi phải nâng cấp bản tin được chuyên nghiệp hơn, hình thức phải bắt mắt hơn.

Với trang này, những chuyên mục cũ của trang chúng tôi gần như được giữ lại hết, có thêm mục truyện ngắn để giới thiệu những sáng tác mới ; mục “du lịch hàm thụ” để mọi người được giới thiệu chuyến đi du lịch kỳ thú của mình hồi năm xưa để độc giả được biết thêm những cái hay lạ ở một vùng đất khác.

 Vẫn theo tôn chỉ ban đầu là “Mong được các bậc đàn anh, các em từng sống dưới mái trường đóng góp, chia sẻ để trang tin này được phong phú hơn, có ý nghĩa hơn”. Khái niệm TH Tống Phước Hiệp là bao gồm cả Collège de Vinh Long rồi Nguyễn Thông, Trường cấp 3 thị xã , Trường TH Lưu Văn Liệt ngày nay. Lần này chúng tôi được giao toàn quyền để đảm bảo lời hứa này của anh Trương Tường Minh, người sáng lập trang 71.com.

Bài vở và ý kiến đóng góp, xin các bạn vui lòng email về : [email protected] hoặc [email protected]

Thành thật cám ơn.

 Lương Minh

Bạn đang đọc nội dung bài viết Reading : The Little Match Girl – Cô Bé Bán Diêm – Speak English trên website Chungemlachiensi.com. Hy vọng một phần nào đó những thông tin mà chúng tôi đã cung cấp là rất hữu ích với bạn. Nếu nội dung bài viết hay, ý nghĩa bạn hãy chia sẻ với bạn bè của mình và luôn theo dõi, ủng hộ chúng tôi để cập nhật những thông tin mới nhất. Chúc bạn một ngày tốt lành!